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Free webinar on NH Supreme Court’s recent landmark Right to Know law rulings Friday

Register here -Online – First Amendment Event with NEFAC and NHPA – June 26 noon – 1 p.m.

Two recent New Hampshire Supreme Court rulings regarding the state’s Right to Know law are major victories supporting government transparency. 

The New Hampshire Press Association, the New England First Amendment Coalition and the Nackey S. Loeb School of Communications are sponsoring a free webinar Friday, May 26 from noon to 1 p.m. to explain how these rulings make it easier for the public to oversee its law enforcement agencies and hold police officers accountable for their actions.

In each case, the high court overruled a previous decision that categorically exempted from the state’s Right to Know law any records related to “internal personnel practices.” With these rulings, that category of records is now more limited. A balancing test — rather than the more strict per se exemption — is now also required to determine if those records should be publicly released.

The webinar will be conducted by two attorneys crucial to arguing these cases:

Rick Gagliuso is a member of the New England First Amendment Coalition and New Hampshire Press Association Board of Directors. Gagliuso is an established construction law authority, media attorney and civic activist who is a shareholder in the Bernstein Shur Law firm in Manchester. He represents media outlets throughout the state.

Gregory V. Sullivan is a member of the NEFAC and Nackey S. Loeb School of Communications Board of Directors. Sullivan serves as general counsel for the Union Leader Corporation. He teaches First Amendment Media Law at Suffolk University Law School in Boston and at the Loeb School in Manchester, N.H.

This event will be moderated by NEFAC Executive Director Justin Silverman and Loeb School Executive Director Laura Simoes.

Rulings:

Seacoast Newspapers v. City of Portsmouth

Union Leader Corp. v. Town of Salem

Coverage

NH Supreme Court overturns precedent used to keep police misconduct secret

Landmark case hailed as ‘new ballgame’ for NH’s Right to Know law

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